We are pleased to have Dr. Luqman Seidu, a adjunct professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine and Director of Allergy for the SouthEast Eosinophilic Disease Center in Atlanta helping us understand the possible reasons why food allergies are quickly increasing --Dr. Stan

Dr. Luqman Seidu, adjunct professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine and Director of Allergy for the SouthEast Eosinophilic Disease Center in Atlanta here explains the complex topic of how classic food allergies develop -- Dr. Stan

Some infants and children continue to have diarrhea after an intestinal infection (gastroenteritis).  Their fever breaks and their vomiting subsides, but the diarrhea continues for days or even weeks.

In the US, 1 out of every 13 children has food allergies--that means that almost 6 million children are affected--and these numbers are increasing.  Of particular concern is that nearly 40% of those have had severe reactions, where they have what is known as anaphylaxis, which is where symptoms can progress rapidly in different tissues and at any age:

I could just as easily have titled this blog, "Baby Colic: The Waste Basket."  That's the term doctors use for an overly broad diagnosis, when it's really a lot of problems that have been thrown in that category, or waste basket.  And for colic, it's because the baby's irritability could actually represent overfeeding, underfeeding, milk allergy, infection, intestinal complaints, or an over-stimulated, fussy baby.

The standard formula for babies who aren't breastfed combines cow's milk proteins with vegetable fat, lactose, and all the known vitamins and minerals that are in breastmilk in order for the formula to mimic not only what's in breastmilk but also to come close to providing the growth and development that breastmilk creates. As a result, two fatty acids, DHA and ARA are added to mimic their stimulate development of the brain and eyes (These are discussed in detail in another blog post).

You may not know it, but most people in the world can't drink milk--not without suffering the consequences of diarrhea, discomfort or gas. They have lactose intolerance. It's hereditary. So at least one of their parents has the same problem. They may not recognize the problem, because over the years they've learned to shy away from milk products. They don't like ice cream or milk, because instead of feeling good when they lick their ice cream cones, they feel bloated and uncomfortable within a few hours.