We are pleased to have Dr. Luqman Seidu, a adjunct professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine and Director of Allergy for the SouthEast Eosinophilic Disease Center in Atlanta helping us understand the possible reasons why food allergies are quickly increasing --Dr. Stan

Dr. Luqman Seidu, adjunct professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine and Director of Allergy for the SouthEast Eosinophilic Disease Center in Atlanta here explains the complex topic of how classic food allergies develop -- Dr. Stan

In the US, 1 out of every 13 children has food allergies--that means that almost 6 million children are affected--and these numbers are increasing.  Of particular concern is that nearly 40% of those have had severe reactions, where they have what is known as anaphylaxis, which is where symptoms can progress rapidly in different tissues and at any age:

Much of the allergy research focuses on who develops allergies, searching for the cause. But an equally interesting question is who outgrows them and when. A team at Northwestern University undertook both questions, funded by the Food Allergy Initiative. We've written about their answer to the first question: How common are food allergies?, and here we focus on their findings on outgrowing food allergies. (Gupta RS. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology 2013.

The standard formula for babies who aren't breastfed combines cow's milk proteins with vegetable fat, lactose, and all the known vitamins and minerals that are in breastmilk in order for the formula to mimic not only what's in breastmilk but also to come close to providing the growth and development that breastmilk creates. As a result, two fatty acids, DHA and ARA are added to mimic their stimulate development of the brain and eyes (These are discussed in detail in another blog post).