by Jourdan Kluger

We are fortunate to have Jourdan Kluger, a speech-language pathologist and feeding therapist at A to Z Pediatric Therapy address sensory and behavioral feeding difficulties. She presents a comprehensive, family-centered approach to developing oral-motor and other skills that help difficult feeders build positive interactions with food -- Dr. Stan

We are pleased to have Dr. Luqman Seidu, a adjunct professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine and Director of Allergy for the SouthEast Eosinophilic Disease Center in Atlanta helping us understand the possible reasons why food allergies are quickly increasing --Dr. Stan

It's hard, very hard to get past an eating disorder like anorexia or bulemia, and many don't. Dr. Bonney Reed-Knight has already written an article about the early signs, because it's critical to recognize it as soon as possible. Here one of my patients who wants to remain anonymous, provides her story about how she got past the problem and on with her life.

What minerals does my child need to be healthy? What do essential minerals do for the growing child? It's easy to remember what iron and calcium do, and what you need to eat in order to make sure you have enough, but how many of us can quickly recall that manganese is also important in bone formation and the metabolism of proteins and fat -- or that it can come from vegetables and grains if you are not a big fan of eating liver and kidneys. This guide should help.

What minerals does my child need to be healthy? What do essential minerals do for the growing child? It's easy to remember what iron and calcium do, and what you need to eat in order to make sure you have enough, but how many of us can quickly recall that manganese is also important in bone formation and the metabolism of proteins and fat -- or that it can come from vegetables and grains if you are not a big fan of eating liver and kidneys. This guide should help.

I am amazed at how many parents tell me their children won't eat or they'll just eat a few foods --and usually those foods are breads, pasta, pizza and potatoes--maybe with a chicken nugget or a little protein or one fruit thrown in (when they're coaxed).  Some of these children are underweight-but just some.  Far more are normal size and some are actually overweight, filling up on these foods and often on sugary drinks to wash them down.

I am particularly pleased to have this article by Bonney Reed-Knight, PhD, a Clinical Psychologist at Emory University School of Medicine and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, not just because it's a wonderful help for parents who are concerned about the possibility that their child has an eating disorder, but also because Bonney was one of my patients as a teen and it's gratifying to now have her contributing as a respected colleague --Dr. Stan

The standard formula for babies who aren't breastfed combines cow's milk proteins with vegetable fat, lactose, and all the known vitamins and minerals that are in breastmilk in order for the formula to mimic not only what's in breastmilk but also to come close to providing the growth and development that breastmilk creates. As a result, two fatty acids, DHA and ARA are added to mimic their stimulate development of the brain and eyes (These are discussed in detail in another blog post).

Because the majority of children who are wheelchair or bed bound have a difficult time eating, special emphasis must be placed on how the feeding is accomplished. The difficulties determine the strategies and techniques needed, and they in turn, have a tremendous impact on the foods--even for the child who can eat by mouth.

Obviously, children who require a tube to be fed need more help than with just the tube and the feeding. They have their underlying problems. and it sometimes takes the parents and caregivers a while to be comfortable with all that means emotionally and with doing the work of caring for the child.

It's not easy in any aspect.